LISTEN AND LEARN

ILP members will gather later this month for this year’s special Centenary Lighting Summit, from 18-19 June at the Leonardo Royal Hotel near Tower Bridge. With 13 keynote CPD presentations and workshops to watch out for, plus an array of sponsors’ events and exhibition showcases, please join us in celebrating 100 years of the Institution

The countdown to this year’s ILP Centenary Lighting Summit is well and truly on. Taking place in just a fortnight, from 18-19 June, this year’s Summit promises be an extra-special celebration of 100 years of the Institution.

So, what can members gathering at the Leonardo Royal Hotel near Tower Bridge expect? First, the Summit will see the return, on Tuesday 18 June, of the glittering black tie Centenary Dinner, which this year is being held at the Dockside Vaults in St Katharine’s Dock.

Second, there will be networking and showcasing opportunities galore, where members can catch up and renew acquaintances, reflect, and look forward. The headline sponsors for the Summit this year are DFL, OrangeTek and Charles Endirect, while content sponsorship will come from Schréder.

There will be ‘dynamic’ exhibition space and floor plan across several areas, all with catering stations. There will be interactive workshops, with each headline sponsor being allotted a 20-minute workshop slot.

Third, and the highlight for many of course, there will be two days of high-level CPD to enjoy and learn from.

The CPD programme has now all been finalised and a total of 13 presentations are set to grace the main stage and two more interactive workshop-style events (which we shall come to). What follows is a snapshot of this year’s programme. 

Emily Bolt, the ILP’s Vice President – Technical and technical services manager (systems architect) at Signify, will discuss lighting’s continued transition towards sustainable and circular economy models, but also how we need to rethink the way we produce and consume.

For this paper, Julian Higgins, assistant highways manager at Hampshire County Council, will outline how the council has successfully reviewed its existing policies on energy strategy and climate change in the context of future street lighting provision.

Toby Penter, senior lighting engineer at WSP, will consider whether we, as lighting engineers, properly consider the impact of an irregular level of illumination? Toby will within this consider the role and impact of guidance such as the ILP’s GN01 and GN08 and whether there are gaps in the guidance. He will discuss the different flashing frequencies we experience and their links to health conditions such as epilepsy. He will invite ILP members to provide their own experience on how they would address this issue if they were asked to undertake an assessment of impact from an inconsistent light source.

Appropriately, given this is a Centenary Lighting Summit, Professor Peter Raynham and Peter Thorns will look back at 100 years V(λ). With V(λ) it became possible to compare the intensity of light sources using a spectrometer or light sensitive element with appropriate filters.

They will also argue that, over the past 100 years as we have studied the impact of light, we have learnt that V(λ) is not perfect. However, for the majority of lighting applications it does still give us a good guide to the visual impact of a given lighting design.

As highlighted in last month’s edition of Lighting Journal, Allan Howard, group technical director, Lighting & Energy Solutions, at WSP, will address why, and how, modern vehicle headlight design is becoming a growing concern within road safety and needs more research.

Allan will highlight how, with the advent of LED lighting technologies, we are now seeing a wide range of vehicle headlights with no uniform consideration to the provision in how the road ahead is lit. Alongside this is varying use of different colour temperature LEDs and perhaps car lights being more a style/brand statement for the manufacturer. The increasing prevalence of vehicles that sit higher on the road, specifically SUVs, may also be exacerbating the problem.

In an era marked by heightened demands for sustainability, connectivity, and the rollout of 5G technology, UK business development manager at Telensa Keith Henry will argue that local authorities face a pressing challenge to upgrade urban infrastructure to meet evolving needs.

Director of Stainton Lighting Design Services, Anthony Smith will consider the whole life of exterior architectural lighting installed in public realm environments. We often, not least in Lighting Journal, look at lighting at switch on, but what will it look like in five years’ time?

The paper will explore what needs to be considered during the design process, such as mounting issues, listed structures, public spaces, electrical infrastructure, control networks, buildability issues, mitigating vandalism, maintenance, and much more.

Technical director at Acrospire, will make the case for why, despite rising popularity, a more critical examination of solar lighting viability is needed. Neil will delve into the concept of ‘solar honesty’, or the need for more transparent evaluation of the wider considerations surrounding solar lighting solutions.

Clare Thomas, head of applications at Urbis Schréder, will join with Gordon Park, design engineer at Bristol City Council, to talk members through Bristol’s ‘One City Climate Strategy’. This includes a three-year programme of work to switch the city’s 29,000 old streetlights to LED and a CMS with the aim of saving council taxpayers up to £2m a year in energy and maintenance costs.

Design and development director at DW Windsor, Alan Grant will use the occasion of the CLS to explore the evolution of lighting in the UK over the past century, transitioning from gas to LED technology.

Sales and marketing director at ASD Lighting, Nathan French will address where street lighting sits – and needs to sit – in the currently highly challenged local authority environment.

Tony Parasram of Free4Mlighting and Dean Wendelborn of Westminster City Council will talk members through how, following the launch of the ILP’s GN22 in 2022, they worked together to undertake a project to assist in obtaining the most accurate inventory of attachments on its stock of lighting columns.

Jon Watt, founder of Gather Consulting, will explore the impact of geographical information systems (GIS) on street lighting including. This will include explaining what GIS is and the benefits it can bring through to its potential impact on key challenges, including mitigating the environmental impact on street lighting, reducing light pollution, integrating with CMS, and empowering a revolution in maintenance services.

For ILP members who want to attend the full event, in other words both days (the Tuesday 18 June and the Wednesday 19 June) the ticket price is £405. The same for a non-member is £619.

There is a discretionary rate for local authority members, of £245, but you must book using your council name and council email address.

For those who wish to attend just one of the days in person, tickets are £140 for members, £247 for non-members and £60 for local authority members.

For those who wish to attend online the price is £33 per day for members, £60 for non-members and £33 again for local authority members.

Tickets for the centenary black tie-dinner at St Katharine’s Dock on the evening of 18 June are £125 plus VAT, which includes the welcome reception, canapes, three-course meal with wine, beer and non-alcoholic options and entertainment. You can book your place at the dinner when you register.

For full details, again, go to: https://summit.theilp.org.uk/

This is an abridged version of the full article that appears in this month’s print edition of Lighting Journal. To access the full article, please click on the link to the edition.

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